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Nutritional sources of vitamin A

Nutritional sources of vitamin A

there are many sources of vitamin A  and natural meals provide us with many solutions to get Vitamin A: such as fish liver oil, animal liver, butter.
Animal sources provide active ingredients to help create retinol inside the human body.

Beta carotene can be found in foods like cabbage, carrots, and spinach which is considered other sources of vitamin A

Some plants also provide vitamin A-converting compounds known as carotenoid antioxidants. The most common is called beta carotene, which can be found in foods like cabbage, carrots, and spinach.

Vitamin A, like other vitamins, is important for good health and to avoid diseases that may affect you from vitamin A deficiency, such as night blindness and some skin diseases.

20 meals are rich in vitamin A.

Vitamin A1, also known as retinol, is found only in foods of animal origin, such as oily fish, liver, cheese, butter and is one of the fat-soluble vitamins

These meals are one of the most important sources of vitamin A and you can count on them knowing the% Daily Value scale, for example, this face says that the portion gives you 20% of the total amount of vitamin A you need per day. So, you want to eat other foods during the day that make up another 80% of the vitamin A you need.

1. Beef liver – 713% DV per serving
1 slice: 6421 mcg (713% DV) 100 g: 9,442 mcg (1,049% DV)

2. Lamb liver – 236% DV per serving
1 ounce: 2,122 mcg (236% DV) 100 g: 7,491 mcg (832% DV)

3. Liver Sausage – 166% DV per serving
1 slice: 1,495 mcg (166% DV) 100g: 8384 mcg (923% DV)

4. Cod liver oil – 150% DV per serving
1 teaspoon: 1,350 mcg (150% DV) 100 g: 30,000 mcg (3333% DV)

5. King Mackerel – 43% DV per serving
Half slice: 388 mcg (43% DV) 100 g: 252 mcg (28% DV)

6. Salmon – 25% DV per serving
Half slice: 229 mcg (25% DV) 100 g: 149 mcg (17% DV)

7. Tuna bluefin – 24% DV per serving
1 ounce: 214 mcg (24% DV) 100 g: 757 mcg (84% DV)

8. Goose liver Pâté – 14% DV per serving
1 tablespoon: 130 mcg (14% DV) 100 g: 1,001 mcg (111% DV)

9. Goat’s Cheese – 13% DV per serving
1 slice: 115 mcg (13% DV) 100 g: 407 mcg (45% DV)

10. Butter – 11% DV per serving
1 tablespoon: 97 mcg (11% DV) 100 g: 684 mcg (76% DV)

11. Limburger cheese – 11% DV per serving
1 slice: 96 mcg (11% DV) 100 g: 340 mcg (38% DV)

12. Cheddar – 10% DV per serving
1 slice: 92 mcg (10% DV) 100g: 330 mcg (37% DV)

13. Camembert – 10% DV per serving
1 Wedge: 92 mcg (10% DV) 100g: 241 mcg (27% DV)

14. Roquefort cheese – 9% DV per serving
1 ounce: 83 mcg (9% DV) 100 g: 294 mcg (33% DV)

15. Boiled egg – 8% DV per serving
1 large egg: 74 mcg (8% DV) 100 g: 149 mcg (17% DV)

16. Trout – 8% DV per serving
1 fillet: 71 mcg (8% DV) 100 g: 100 mcg (11% DV)

17. Blue Cheese – 6% DV per serving
1 ounce: 56 mcg (6% DV) 100 g: 198 mcg (22% DV)

18. Cheese cream – 5% DV per serving
1 tablespoon: 45 mcg (5% DV) 100 g: 308 mcg (34% DV)

19. Caviar – 5% DV per serving
1 tablespoon: 43 mcg (5% DV) 100 g: 271 mcg (30% DV)

20. Feta cheese – 4% DV per serving
1 ounce: 35 mcg (4% DV) 100 g: 125 mcg (14% DV)

10 fruits rich in Pro Vitamin A

sources of vitamin A

Provitamin A is generally more abundant in vegetables than fruits

Provitamin A is generally more abundant in vegetables than fruits. But some fruits provide good amounts of it, as shown below.

1. Mango – 20% DV per serving
1 medium mango: 181 mcg (20% DV) 100g: 54 mcg (6% DV)

2. Melons – 19% DV per serving
1 large wedge: 172 mcg (19% DV) 100g: 169 mcg (19% DV)

3. Pink or Red Grapefruit – 16% DV per serving
1 medium grapefruit: 143 mcg (16% DV) 100 g: 58 mcg (6% DV)

4. Watermelon – 9% DV per serving
1 wedge: 80 mcg (9% DV) 100g: 28 mcg (3% DV)

5. Papaya – 8% DV per serving
A small piece of papaya: 74 mcg (8% DV) 100 g: 47 mcg (5% DV)

6. Apricot – 4% DV per serving
1 medium apricot: 34 mcg (4% DV) 100g: 96 mcg (11% DV)

7. Mandarin – 3% DV per serving
1 medium mandarin: 30 mcg (3% DV) 100 g: 34 mcg (4% DV)

8. Nectarine – 3% DV per serving
1 medium nectar: ​​24 mcg (3% DV) 100 g: 17 mcg (2% DV)

9. Guava – 2% DV per serving
1 medium guava: 17 mcg (2% DV) 100 g: 31 mcg (3% DV)

10. Fruit Passion – 1% DV per serving
1 medium fruit: 12 mcg (1% DV) 100 g: 64 mcg (7% DV)

The amount of vitamin A recommended

Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A

The recommended intake of vitamin A varies by age and gender. Here are some daily allowable values

Infants (0-12 months): 400-500 micrograms
Children aged 1-3: 300 mcg
Children aged 4-8: 400 mcg
Children aged 9-13: 600 mcg
Adult women: 700 mcg
Adult men: 900 mcg

night blindness

What is night blindness disease?

Night blindness is a type of visual impairment also known as nyctalopia. People with night blindness have poor vision at night or in dimly lit environments.

Although the term “night blindness” means that you cannot see it at night, this is not the case. You may have more difficulty seeing or driving in the dark.

Some types of night blindness can be treated while others are not. See your doctor determine the underlying cause of your vision impairment. Once you know the cause of the problem, you can take steps to correct your vision

Infection with this disease affects the field of vision, and the affected person needs to check a lot to see things around him.

How do we find out who is afflicted with it

To determine night blindness, the American Academy of Ophthalmology suggests that people consider the following questions:

  • Is moving around the house in dim light difficult?
  • Is driving at night increasingly difficult?
  • Is it difficult to recognize faces in low light?
  • How long does it take to adapt to a lighting room and is it longer than normal?
  • Is it taking too long to see in a dark room after being in the light?

Symptoms of night blindness

Night blindness has several different symptoms for the person:

  • Poor vision at night: The person’s inability to see clearly in the dark, and stumbling in things while moving due to lack of vision, especially in low light.
  • Blurred vision: this is an indication of a problem in the eye, it could be night blindness or other diseases.
  • Keratitis: As a patient with a night blind night, the cornea can become dehydrated and irritation of the cornea more than others.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa: gray spots can be seen in the white of the eye.
  • It took a long time to adjust the eyesight to change the lighting.

What are the causes of night blindness

Some eye diseases and complaints can cause night blindness, including:

  • Nearsightedness, or blurred vision when looking at distant objects
  • Cataracts or so-called clouding of the lens
  • Retinitis pigmentosa, which occurs when the dark pigment collects in your retina and creates what is called a tunnel vision.
  • night blindness
  • The so-called tunnel vision
  • Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that affects both hearing and sight

The elderly have a greater risk of developing cataracts. Thus, children or young adults are more likely to have night blindness due to cataracts.

In rare cases in the United States or in other parts of the world where diets may differ, a lack of Vitamin A can also lead to night blindness.

  • Vitamin A, also called retinol, plays a role in converting nerve impulses into images in the retina. The retina is a light-sensitive area in the back of your eyes.
  • People with pancreatic insufficiencies, such as individuals with cystic fibrosis, find it difficult to absorb fat and are at greater risk of developing vitamin A deficiency because vitamin A is fat-soluble. This puts them at greater risk of developing night blindness.
  • People with high blood glucose or diabetes also have a higher risk of developing eye diseases, such as cataracts.

How to treat night blindness

You should know the real reason for this, and this is what the ophthalmologist will do after examining your eyes to diagnose night blindness. You may also need to give a blood sample. A blood test can measure vitamin A and glucose levels.

The promising thing is that night blindness caused by nearsightedness, cataracts or vitamin A deficiency can be treated. Using corrective lenses, such as glasses or contacts, can improve short-term vision during the day and at night.

Tell your doctor if you still have a vision problem in dim light even with corrective lenses.

  • Cataract

Cloudy parts of your eye lens are known as cataracts. It can be removed through surgery. Your surgeon will replace the cloudy lens with a clear artificial lens. Night blindness will improve dramatically after surgery if this is the underlying cause.

  • Vitamin A deficiency

It is a very important vitamin for vision and vision. If vitamin A levels are low, your doctor may recommend vitamin supplements. Take supplements as directed.

Most people do not have a vitamin A deficiency because they get proper nutrition.

  • Genetic conditions

Genetic conditions that cause night blindness, such as retinitis pigmentosa, cannot be treated. The gene that causes pigment accumulation in the retina does not respond to corrective lenses or surgery.

Vitamin A deficiency

Vitamin A deficiency may cause many damages, vitamins are a group of substances that the body needs in small quantities to maintain health.

We consider Vitamin A is one of the fat-soluble vitamins. Vitamin A cannot be made by the human body, and therefore it must be an essential part of the diet.

Vitamin A is important for eye health, important for healthy skin, and for helping you fight infection.

Foods that contain Vitamin A include liver, milk, eggs and fish liver oils. Another substance called beta carotene (found in leafy green, green, and yellow fruits) can also be converted by your body to vitamin A.

Mild forms of vitamin A deficiency can usually be treated without any long-term problems. Vitamin A deficiency is most common in low-income countries, where it is often very dangerous and may cause vision loss and even death.

What is vitamin A deficiency, and how common is it?

A lack of Vitamin A is caused in your body by a lack of adequate amounts of Vitamin A in your diet. Over time, a lack of vitamin A means that you may have vision problems and be less able to fight infections

According to WHO reports on vitamin A deficiency:

  • An estimated 250 million preschool-age children are deficient in vitamin A, and a large proportion of pregnant women in areas with vitamin A deficiency are likely to be deficient in vitamin A.
  • Nearly 250 to 500,000 children with vitamin A deficiency suffer from blindness or night blindness each year, half of them die within 12 months of losing their eyesight.
  • Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in more than half of all countries, especially in Africa and Southeast Asia, where it affects young children and pregnant women in low-income countries.

What are the symptoms caused by vitamin A deficiency?

We can divide Vitamin A deficiency into two main types

A slight deficiency in vitamin Mild forms, and may not show symptoms, but may appear on the body only symptoms of fatigue and fatigue

The most severe forms of vitamin A deficiency are severe and cause:

  • Eye and vision problems
  • Poor vision in the dark (night blindness).
  • Thinning and ulceration of the cornea on the surface of the eyes (cornea).
  • Dryness of the conjunctiva and cornea on the surface of the eye (dry mouth).
  • Foam oval, triple or irregular spots on the whites of the eyes (called Bitot spots).
  • Severe visual impairment (due to damage to the retina) in the back of the eye.
  • Skin and hair problems: dryness of skin, hair, and itching

Both mild and severe forms of vitamin A may cause an increased risk:

  • infections, including infections of the throat and chest, and gastroenteritis.
  • Delayed growth and bone development in children and adolescents.
  • Infertility and Miscarriage Abortion.

Night blindness is one of the most common diseases associated with vitamin A deficiency. We will now learn about the most important symptoms of night blindness.

Symptoms of night blindness

Night blindness has several different symptoms for the person:

  • Poor vision at night: The person’s inability to see clearly in the dark, and stumbling in things while moving due to lack of vision, especially in low light.
  • Blurred vision: this is an indication of a problem in the eye, it could be night blindness or other diseases.
  • Keratitis: As a patient with a night blind night, the cornea can become dehydrated and irritation of the cornea more than others.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa: gray spots can be seen in the white of the eye.
    It took a long time to adjust the eyesight to change the lighting.
    Causes of vitamin A deficiency

Vitamin A deficiency may also occur when your body is unable to utilize vitamin A in your diet or is unable to absorb it. This may be caused by a variety of diseases, including:

  • Coeliac disease
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Giardiasis – inflammation of the intestine (intestine).
  • Cystic fibrosis.
  • People with pancreatic insufficiency, such as individuals with cystic fibrosis, find it difficult to absorb fat and are at greater risk of developing vitamin A deficiency because vitamin A is fat-soluble. This puts them at greater risk of developing night blindness.
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Obstruction the bile flow from the liver and gallbladder to your gut.